NINE INCH NAILS, SKINNY PUPPY, EINSTURZENDE NEUBAUTEN and MINISTRY EARLY YEARS RARE FOOTAGE

Skinny Puppy playing live at Club Holiday in Toronto, ONT on November 16, 1985.

Nine Inch Nails playing live at Pipeline in Newark, NJ on December 9, 1989.

Ministry playing live at Copa in Toronto, ONT on December 12, 1988.

Einstürzende Neubauten playing live at Theaterfabrik in München on September 28, 1989.

Thanx to COOLERTHANJESUS

Annunci

HYPNOTIC FANTASY ART BY ANDREW FEREZ

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You may know Russian artist Andrew Ferez for his covers of popular Game of Thrones novels like “A Song of Ice and Fire”. Although he borrows from the stories he illustrates, his images possess their own mysterious meaning. His digital art transports us into our subconscious with haunting pictures of crumbling, imaginary worlds. They are inhabited by ghostly figures, skulls and demons, combined with gothic motifs like roses and dimly lit candles. Other images are a trick of the eye, where the shape of a building, smoke rings, or golden tree suddenly reveals a woman’s face. A common feature in this apocalyptic environment is halls of mirrors and never ending labyrinths. Ferez’s unique perspective and impossible architecture recalls the work of graphic artists like M.C. Escher. His expressive tones and subdued color palette creates an eerie, yet exciting atmosphere that is almost palpable. Recurring themes of loneliness, musical composition, and change of the season also provide Ferez with inspiration. For an even deeper understanding, you’ll just have to read the books his work adorns.

Andrew Ferez main site

D.

MID-CENTURY POSTWAR ITALIAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, Federico Fellini. These were the pillars of Italian Neorealism; the auteurs who captured the psyche and desolate conditions of the Italian lower-class from 1944 to 1952, lost in a desperation that poverty begets. Their contemporaries, photographers like Ugo Zovetti, Ferruccio Crovatto, and Bruno Rosso, used their medium in similar fashion. The gritty aesthetic and subject matter draws direct parallels to films like “Open City” and “The Bicycle Thief”, giving a real, reactionary sense against fascism and the subsequent socio-political strifes. They unapologetically place the situation in front of you, unmediated and unadorned. The compositions are stunning, expressing the postwar Nihilism with large, unoccupied spaces.

“Mid-Century Postwar Italian Photography” is currently on exhibit at Keith De Lellis Gallery in Manhattan.

Keith De Lellis Gallery

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